Category Archives: Writing

The Heart of the Fields: The Mythology of Forster’s English Landscape

The Heart of the Fields The Mythology of Forster’s English Landscape In Aspects of the Novel, E.M. Forster writes of Meredith, “What is really tragic and enduring in the scenery of England was hidden from him, and so is what … Continue reading

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How art changes us

I began to understand art as a kind of black box the reader enters. He enters in one state of mind and exits in another. The writer gets no points just because what’s inside the box bears some linear resemblance … Continue reading

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The Androgyny of Creativity

Woolf believed that the creative mind is androgynous. She was an expert in Elizabethan literature. She loved both the scope and the certainty of the Renaissance mind. Shakespeare, writing his sonnets to boys and women with equal passion, understanding the … Continue reading

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Trauma Fiction

“Beyond stating the bare facts, trauma cannot speak of itself. If it could, it wouldn’t be trauma. The odd purity of true suffering, in this case, is that it demonstrates nothing.” – Burning Down the House: Essays on Fiction (Charles … Continue reading

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The Godliness of Objects

I recently re-read “Talking Forks: Fiction and the Inner Life of Objects,” an essay from Charles Baxter’s book Burning Down The House: Essays on Fiction. To me, the most interesting parts of the essay were when Baxter touched on the religious … Continue reading

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My Great Weakness

Once in a while, I give in: I buy books. When I do, I limit myself with the following parameters: the book must be either 1) extremely unusual; 2) so long that if I got it from the library I … Continue reading

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